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HomeFarmingEU Votes To Ban Foie Gras Force-Feeding And Caged Animal Farming -...

EU Votes To Ban Foie Gras Force-Feeding And Caged Animal Farming – Intelligent Living

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In Europe, family farms make up 95% of all farms, ranging from small to larger operations. These large farms include intensive animal farming and industrial livestock production. However, many of the practices of these factory farms are under significant criticism for their mistreatment of animals.
The EU Parliament has noticed and is calling for a ban on caged animal farming by 2027, after voting overwhelmingly in favor of ending the cruel practice. The victory saw 558 votes favoring the ban, with only 37 opposing the ban and 85 abstaining. The vote follows a petition titled “End The Cage Age,” which demanded a phase-out of cages in animal agriculture.
This ban would also apply to the ruthless force-feeding of geese and ducks to fatten their livers for foie gras, a delicacy worldwide, particularly in France.
The torture of force-feeding begins when the birds reach about 8 to 10 weeks old and last around four weeks. The process, also known as “gavage,” involves workers shoving metal tubes down the birds’ throats and pumping their stomachs full of far more food than they usually eat. This procedure is repeated multiple times a day. As a result, the force-feeding causes the birds’ livers to grow up to ten times their natural size.
Force-feeding results in many illnesses and diseases, including hepatic lipidosis, bacterial and fungal infections, organ failure, injuries to the birds’ beaks and throats, and pneumonia. On top of having to endure the suffering of force-feeding, their wire cages cause foot and leg injuries and intense confinement mental torture.
Sadly, countless ducks hyperventilate as their unnaturally large livers press against their lungs, making it difficult for them to breathe, and many ducks die from the horrendous force-feeding process. Finally, birds who survive the four weeks are hung upside down and their throats cut, causing them to bleed to death slowly.
Today, foie gras production is banned in several countries, including Finland, Poland, Czech Republic, Turkey, and Italy. In addition, Foie gras production within Britain has been illegal since 2006, but the government continues to import it.
The ‘End the Cage Age’ petition began in September 2018 by European citizens. So far, it has collected nearly 1.4 million signatures in 18 member states in support of animal welfare.
One of the citizens leading the petition drive, Olga Kikou, Head of Compassion in World Farming EU, told Euro News that many animals never leave their cramped cages during their entire life. These cages are sometimes so tiny that the birds can’t even fully turn around or lay down. “We have estimated, and this is a very conservative number, that over 300 million animals, farmed animals, spend most of their life or their entire life in cages in Europe, every year,” Kikou said. The Parliament highlights that there are “grave concerns” about the conditions of these animals.
According to Reuters, the EU’s standards are currently one of the world’s most strict. They already include some restrictions on caged farming, such as a ban on tightly packed battery cages for hens while still allowing more spacious cages. The Czech Republic has pledged to ban caged chickens, while Austria and Luxembourg have banned them entirely. Unfortunately, 90% of all farmed rabbits are still kept in small cages.
Finally, the Parliament states that the legislation should include ways to financially support farmers to help them transition to higher animal welfare standards, and all animal products imported into the EU must comply with the new standards. This is excellent news for farm animals, animal activists, and anyone with compassion for mistreated living beings.


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